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Welcome to PAL Stratford

Who Are We?

Performing Arts Lodge (PAL) Stratford is a volunteer-based Canadian charitable organization dedicated to the provision of affordable housing, social assistance and other services to local members and associates of Canada’s professional and performing arts community who are in need of assistance by reason of low income, age or disability.

PAL Stratford was established as a non-profit organization in 2002 and in 2005 was registered as a Charitable Organization (86363 2881 RR0001). PAL Stratford is one of eight Chapters of PAL Canada; others are located in Halifax, Ottawa, Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver. Each Chapter is an independent organization.

The "Places, please" capital fundraising campaign is seeking community support to retire the mortgage on the recently opened affordable housing units at 101 Brunswick Street, Stratford.

What Do We Do?

The principal object of all PAL organizations is to provide affordable housing to those fifty-five years and older who are, or were, associated with Canada’s professional and performing arts communities. PAL’s goal is to assist senior members of our community in living independently and securely.

PAL Stratford is already providing services to the community through Supporting Cast, a volunteer outreach group, which offers confidential support to retirement age or ill members. Services include assistance in dealing with local social and community agencies, as well as offering companionship, check-up phone calls, rides to appointments and running errands. organization. Supporting Cast also organizes group activities, including a weekly coffee and conversation hour at a local restaurant.

Supporting Cast has an email for easy contact, If you would like to join this group, please email us at: supportingcast@palstratford.org

A Brief History

In October 1999, Tom Patterson, Stratford Festival Founder and Herbert Whittaker, Critic Emeritus for the Globe and Mail, spearheaded the inception of PAL Stratford, using the PAL Toronto Lodge as a model.

They recognized that the Stratford Festival had a substantial legacy: an aging theatre and arts community whose members wished to continue living in and around Stratford. As well, there are others in the professional and performing arts who have also chosen to make their home in Stratford.

True to Tom’s vision, PAL Stratford’s long-term goal is to provide affordable congenial housing for these valued members of the Stratford community. Our primary need is to find a building or a site that can be used to provide this kind of facility.

Over the years we have been involved in a number of different projects: twice with different owners of 500 Ontario Street, the land immediately west of the Arden Park Hotel as well as with the owner of 210 Water Street. We seriously considered Falstaff School when it was available. In 2005 we made an unsuccessful bid for City-owned property on Queensland Drive.

We recently opened an affordable housing unit PAL Place at 101 Brunswick Street, Stratford.

PAL Stratford is governed by an elected Board of Directors.

PAL Stratford Endorsements


The Stratford & Shaw Coalition of
Theatre Professionals & Friends of Pal

Statement of Support for PAL Stratford

A sanctuary, a safety net, a home, a community, PAL Place Stratford will be there for those of our own who find themselves in times of need during and at the end of careers that can be uncertain and insecure.
 
We the undersigned extend our enthusiastic endorsement to the Stratford Performing Arts Lodge project at 101 Brunswick Street, Stratford, Ontario.
 
PAL is a proven success story in several other locales nationwide. We heartily endorse and look forward to the same success story becoming reality here in Stratford.


(I authorize PAL to acknowledge my endorsement in its fundraising materials)

     
Geraint Wyn Davies Peter Hutt Ian D. Clark
Len and Heather Cariou Terri Dans Roberta Maxwell
Frank Moore Lesley Walker-Fitzpatrick Bruce Dow
Barbara Bryne Denny Spence Martha Henry
E. B. Smith Xuan Fraser Juan Chioran
Ben Carlson Tristan Tidswell Nicola Pantin
Tyrone Savage Luke Humphrey Lucy Peacock
Jeff Hughes Victor Ertmanis David Collins
Steven Gartner Keith Dinicol Margret Palmer
Kelsey Rae Shira Ginsler Don Sweete
Alicia Kuntze Nancy Benjamin Art Fortin
Nick Glenn AnthonyGentile Tim J. Hartman
Alec Cooper Angela Marshall Carl Danielson
Michael Barber Barry Gammon Joyce Lange
Margaret Blowes John Hautin Sandy Dunn
Scott Boyce Nicko Giannakos Jordan Till
Karl Wylie Cindy Tousshan Stephen Cota
Zeph Williams Gail Sorensen Jill Merner
Jay T. Schramek Ben Thomas Judy Smith
Brian Counihan Callan Potter Christine Yundt
Patricia Taylor Margret Lamb Ruby Joy
Caroline Yates Kelly McIntosh Lois Zurell
Karen Mills Deborah Howes Josie Muncaster
Dianne Chisholm Leslie Lee Ingrid Schmekies
William Gosling Jason Collier Leslie Wade
Lally Cadeau David Keeley Amanda Ryan
Margaret Ryerson Tina Watson Vic Ryan
Pam Brierley Brenda Keogh John Banks
Kyle Golemba Dan MacDonald Brenda Martin
Ann Swerdfager Richard Fitzpatrick M. K. Bohdanetzky
Roy F. Brown David Spence Brian Reynolds
Gayle Tribick Paul Shilton Robert King
Marie Fewer Renate Hanson Varrick Grimes
Alon Nashman Paul Thompson Vern Good
Sarah Mansikka Gillian Gallow Brenda Pilatzke
Daniel Mac Ivor Jessica Stinson Janine Pearson
Scott Farley Katherine Laing Nigel Bennett
Skye Brandon Christopher Sibbald John Vickery
Robin McCulloch Kristian Truelsen Maria Vacratsis
Stephen Woodjetts Michael Gyapjas Raemond Fletcher
Steve Bayne Barbara Young Kelley Teahen
Angela Smith Linda Mackay Brian Tree
Nora Polley Paul Elliot Aggie Elliot
Iain Paterson Wayne Mahon Dean Gabourie
Karen McCabe Maxine A. Graham John Pennoyer
Kim Foster Kevin Gormley Stacy Smith
Denise Fergusson Alan Laing Rachel Neville-Fox
Patti Muma-Cook Nancy Ferguson Ian Deakin
Jeff Wincott Jeremy Kushnier Michael Roth
Dave Collier Benedict Campbell Lisa Dent-Couturier
Kennedy C. MacKinnon Mark Beckett Ted Dykstra
Brian Crockatt Barbara Ross Carmen Grant
Carol A. Miller Peggy Mahon Chilina Kennedy
Jacob James    
     

Endorsement List


Note to Stratford & Shaw Theatre
Professionals & Friends of PAL:
You can add your endorsement by clicking the link
below to send us an email. We will add your name
as soon as possible after we receive your email.

 I endorse PAL Stratford 

Brian Mcdonald will be remembered ...



Funeral Service, Saturday, December 6th at 2:00 p.m.,
Central United Church, 194 Avondale Avenue, Stratford, Ontario.



As posted in the Beacon Herald, December 1, 2014.

Brian Macdonald, the legendary director and choreographer behind some of theatre's most beloved musical productions, died at his Stratford home on Saturday at the age of 86.

Macdonald was born in Montreal in 1928 and is widely recognized as a pioneer in Canadian theatre. His talent and expertise were boundless and his productions were admired internationally.

His first introduction to the Stratford Festival came during the theatre's early days. In 1957 his satirical revue My Fur Lady played at what would become the Avon Theatre and then went on to tour 82 Canadian cities with more than 400 performances.

He would return to the Festival in later years and was a member of the company for 17 seasons. He left an indelible mark on the Festival with his fresh approach to several Gilbert and Sullivan operettas like The Mikado, HMS Pinafore and The Pirates of Penzance which also toured across Canada and in London and New York.

“At Stratford he will be especially remembered for reinventing the Gilbert and Sullivan canon,” said Antoni Cimolino, artistic director. “He brought an entirely new and contemporary approach to what, by the early 1980s, had become neglected classics. Under his inventive direction, the updated lyrics and movement sparkled with the same creative lustre as the iconic music. The result, like Brian himself, was unforgettable.”

During his 60-year career, Macdonald was honoured with many prestigious awards among them are the Order of Canada, of which he was one of the first recipients, a Governor General's Performing Arts Award for Lifetime Artistic Achievement, the Molson Prize, Paris International Gold Star for Choreography and Walter Carsen Prize for Excellence in the Performing Arts.

Just last year, Macdonald was awarded a Bronze Star—a program established by Stratford city council in partnership with the Festival back in 2002 to recognize individuals who have contributed to the cultural or social fabric of the city. ​

Despite his many awards his humility remained intact.

“I was completely surprised. I'm very happy they thought of me,” he said after receiving the Bronze Star.

Macdonald's star is in front of the Avon Theatre.

He started his career as a child actor on CBC Radio and later moved to CBC TV as a dancer/ choreographer and began directing live variety shows.

Though he loved ballet an injury ended his dancing career. Regardless, he was a significant part of the Canadian and international ballet scenes. He was a founding member of the National Ballet of Canada and he was closely associated with the Royal Winnipeg Ballet throughout the 1950s and '60s. He headed up important ballet companies in Sweden, The United States and Israel.

Just this past October, though he had cancer, he directed a revival of his 1990 production of Madama Butterfly. It was the sixth time the Canadian Opera Company mounted his production.

His final public appearance was for the curtain calls on opening night.

Macdonald leaves behind his wife Annette av Paul whom he met at the Royal Swedish Ballet in the 1960s, and his son Wyatt. He was predeceased by his first wife Olivia Wyatt.

Macdonald's funeral will be held at W.G. Young Funeral home on Saturday. [Please note change of venue below.]

A memorial will be held at the Festival Theatre on May 3 and, fittingly, the 2015 production of Carousel, a play he once directed at the Festival, will be dedicated to his memory.

laura.cudworth@sunmedia.ca


Also: Obituary posted at the W G Young website.
Service Information: Funeral Service, Saturday, December 6th at 2:00 p.m., Central United Church, 194 Avondale Avenue, Stratford, Ontario.
Memorial Donations: PAL Stratford

Famed Canadian director, choreographer Brian Macdonald dies

As posted in the Globe and Mail, November 29, 2014.

By DEIRDRE KELLY
The Globe and Mail

The esteemed Canadian director and choreographer Brian Macdonald died Saturday in Stratford, Ont. at the age of 86.

Mr. Macdonald, a charter member of the National Ballet of Canada, went on to direct musical theatre, opera as well as the award-winning productions of Gilbert and Sullivan for Canada's Stratford Festival.

Mr. Macdonald was an early recipient of the Order of Canada, later elevated to the status of Companion in 2002, and received numerous awards over his lifelong career which started when he was a child actor for CBC Radio.

Born May 14, 1928 in Montreal, he leaves behind his wife of 50 years, the former Les Grands Ballets Canadiens ballerina Annette av Paul, and his son from an earlier marriage, Wyatt Macdonald.

A stern task master with a strong, defined perfectionist streak, Mr. Macdonald still worked collaboratively with many Canadian artists including the composers R. Murray Schafer and Gilles Vigneault, as well as visual artists and designers like Robert Prévost and Walter Redinger.

A former dancer, Mr. Macdonald's best partnerships were formed at the ballet, including the National Ballet of Canada, which he joined in 1951 under then-director Celia Franca. In 1956 he founded his own company, the Montreal Theatre Ballet.

In 1957 Mr. Macdonald directed the McGill satirical review, My Fur Lady, which toured Canada with 400 performances in 82 venues.

Mr. Macdonald worked with the country's leading dance companies, including Les Grands Ballets Canadiens and the Royal Winnipeg Ballet.

He also had a long and fruitful association with the Banff Centre in Alberta, where he served as choreographer, teacher and mentor to several generations of performers for more than 45 years.

Mr. Macdonald had also been artistic director of the Royal Swedish Ballet in Stockholm, one of the oldest and most prestigious classical dance companies in the world, from 1964 to 1967. He then went on to become artistic director of the Harkness Ballet in New York City from 1967 to 1968, and Israel's Batsheva Dance Company from 1971 to 1972.

He created a total of 19 productions at Stratford, including musical theatre and operetta.

Most recently, Mr. Macdonald returned to the stage in October as director of his own production of Puccini's Madama Butterfly for the Canadian Opera Company, which took place in Toronto.

An indefatigable spirit and towering presence in the Canadian arts scene, Mr. Macdonald was a true one-of-a-kind.


Also: Stratford Festival Media Release, December 1, 2014.

Stratford mourns the death of renowned director and choreographer Brian Macdonald
"... The Stratford Festival is dedicating the 2015 production of Carousel to Mr Macdonald’s memory.
It will hold a memorial at the Festival Theatre on May 3."

Stratford Festival Image Gallery

Also: Article posted on Start Stratford, September 2011.
Interview by Lee Macdougall. Photos by Ann Baggley.

PAL Stratford | Hughson Hall

PAL Stratford invites you to

Christmas Cheer
at Hughson Hall


Please join us for 'Nog & Nibblies

Sunday December 7, 2014

from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
at Hughson Hall
220 Hibernia Street, Stratford

Please RSVP by November 30th
to Clinton & Ross at 519-305-0780
or by email: info@hughsonhall.com

This is a FREE event for members of PAL Stratford
Guests of members are welcome,
we kindly request a $5 donation at the door.


Click graphic for larger version

Festival Theatre Celebration for Bernard Hopkins

As posted by the Stratford Beacon Herald , November 17, 2014


The Festival stage was the perfect setting for the celebration.

In his 24 seasons with the Stratford Festival, Bernard Hopkins had made that stage a second home. He had captivated audiences and fellow actors in an unforgettable series of roles while treading those boards.

So on Sunday, Hopkins’ friends and family took to the same stage to pay tribute to the man, sharing stories, memories and songs with one final audience.

“Bernard would be so pleased to see so many friends here today,” said artistic director Antoni Cimolino, gazing out at the faces in the Festival Theatre.

Encircled by the costumes from three of his most memorable roles – Parolles from All’s Well That Ends Well, Touchstone from As You Like It and Snug from A Midsummer Night’s Dream – Hopkins’ Stratford Festival family talked about a man with a passion for the “breathless wonder” of theatre.

“Art came first for this man,” Cimolino said. “He fiercely valued, above all else, true service – true service to art and true service to art in ourselves.”

The first speaker at the celebration of Hopkins’ life, Cimolino talked not only of Hopkins’ surpassing talent as an actor, but praised his dedication as both a director and a teacher.

“I’ve lost a mentor and I’ve lost a chum,” Cimolino said. “For the company, the company has lost a voice – a voice that valued innocence and valued beauty, a voice that was filled with joy. He loved this theatre. He loved this stage.

“Let’s remember that voice.”

Hopkins died peacefully on Wednesday, Oct. 22, in the arms of his husband, Ian White.

Actor Lucy Peacock talked about fabulous dinners during their shared time in late-1970s Montreal. Hopkins would summon young actors to his hilltop home for wonderful meals, bottles of wine and hours of conversation.

“We would flock to him and fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden age,” Peacock said. “… The wine would flow with gusto, Bern with his cigarette holder and his scarves.”

The discussions, she said, were “challenging, and full of mysteries and metaphors.”

“There was never, ever nothing to discuss, and we would laugh sans intermission.”

In addition to anecdotes from his theatre family, the celebration included a couple of songs from Hopkins’ beloved musicals and a handful of dramatic recitations. Company member Shane Carty performed a rousing She Loves Me from the eponymous musical by Joe Masteroff, Sheldon Harnick and Jerry Bock while actor Thom Allison sang Not While I’m Around from Stephen Sondheim’s Sweeney Todd.

“Bern loved musicals,” Carty said by way of introduction, “and he loved this one.”

Tom McCamus paid tribute to his old friend with a reading of The God Forsakes Antony, a poem by Constantine P. Cavafy. Sharry Flett took to the stage to recite Philip Larkin’s An Arundel Tomb, a poem that was read at the poet’s own memorial service.

“Our almost-instinct almost true: What will survive of us is love.”

Love was also the “leitmotif” of Sara Topham’s remembrances of her friend and mentor.

“It has been my privilege to call Bernard Hopkins my teacher and my friend,” she said. “He taught me about acting, about love and about life … and I know I’m not alone in that experience … He never, ever stopped learning; he never, ever stopped teaching, and he never, ever stopped loving.”

While many friends were able to share their love for Hopkins in person, many others were unable to make the trip to Stratford because of professional commitments. Cimolino and Chick Reid shared some of the letters that had arrived, reading the remembrances from Brian Bedford, the Lear to Hopkins’ Fool, and fellow acots Kelly Handerek, Kyle Blair and Seana McKenna.

“It was his unbridled passion for the theatre that inspired so many of us,” Blair wrote.

The celebration of Hopkins’ life concluded with a performance of the funeral song from Shakespeare’s Cymbeline by actors Stephen Gartner and Gordon S. Miller, who shared the famous lines: “Fear no more the heat o' the sun, Nor the furious winter's rages; Thou thy worldly task hast done, Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages: Golden lads and girls all must, As chimney-sweepers, come to dust.”

After Gartner and Miller left the stage, the entire company, including the audience, finished by singing the hymn, At the River, giving a final shared voice to the celebration.

And then the service ended on another perfect note, with a closing – and rousing – standing ovation for Bernard Hopkins.

Festival dedicates plays to three beloved actors


MEDIA RELEASE


Memorial for Bernard Hopkins set for Nov. 16 at the Festival Theatre

October 28, 2014 … The Stratford Festival has lost three beloved former company members over the past number of weeks and will be dedicating productions to their memory next season. The 2015 production of The Alchemist will be dedicated to Edward Atienza. She Stoops to Conquer will be dedicated to Joyce Campion. Love’s Labour’s Lost will be dedicated to Bernard Hopkins.

The Festival has also set the date for a memorial for Mr. Hopkins. It will be held on Sunday, November 16, at 11 a.m., in the Festival Theatre. All are welcome to attend.

“Joyce, Teddy and Bern were among the very finest talents to be part of the history of the Festival company,” said Artistic Director Antoni Cimolino. “Each one of them had an irrepressible spirit that brought wit, energy and charisma to any part they played. We dedicate these productions in recognition of their important contribution to Stratford and with a sad fondness for the passing of our fellow players.”

Mr. Atienza, who was a familiar face on the Festival’s stages for 12 seasons in the 1970s, ’80s and early ’90s, died on September 17. He had a long and distinguished career, starting in 1949 in his native England, where he worked at the Old Vic and what is now the Royal Shakespeare Company.

He first joined the Festival in 1972, playing Touchstone in William Hutt’s production of As You Like It and the Fool to Mr. Hutt’s Lear. His many other memorable performances at Stratford included Estragon in Waiting for Godot, Feste in Twelfth Night, Thersites in Troilus and Cressida, Kemp in Entertaining Mr. Sloane, Trinculo in The Tempest and the title role in King John. He also created and performed his own one-man show, When That I Was… He appeared in several films, including The Battle of the River Plate (1956) and Peter Ustinov’s Romanoff and Juliet (1961).

Mr. Cimolino has chosen to dedicate his production of The Alchemist to Mr. Atienza because the actor played Subtle in a Yale Repertory Company production of the play that was directed by former Stratford Artistic Director John Hirsch and featured Stephen Ouimette as Face. “Although it has been many years since Teddy retired from the stage, his loss has been heavily felt by all who knew him and admired his splendid work,” said Mr. Cimolino.

Ms Campion, whose Stratford career stretched over 19 seasons between 1968 and 2009, died on September 3. As warmly loved as she was highly admired, she was a dear friend and inspiring role model to countless fellow artists, not just in Stratford but also at the Shaw Festival, where she spent 10 seasons, and other theatres across Canada and the U.S, as well as in the U.K. and her native Ireland. 
 
Having toured with the pioneering Canadian Players in 1963 and ’64, Ms Campion first joined the Festival company in 1968. Her many memorable roles at Stratford include Hannah Bauman in Quiet in the Land, Mrs. Higgins in My Fair Lady, the Duchess of York in Richard II and Kate Tardwell in Elizabeth Rex (which she reprised in the 2004 film). In 2005, she all but stole the show as Saunders the maid in Fallen Angels. She received a Dora Mavor Moore Award for her role as Charlotte in Bonjour, là, Bonjour with CentreStage in Toronto and a Gemini Award nomination for her performance in Street Legal.

Her last season with the Festival was in 2009, when she played Anfisa in Three Sisters, directed by Martha Henry. This connection led Mr. Cimolino to select Ms Henry’s production of She Stoops to Conquer for the dedication. “This play features exactly the sort of irrepressible women Joyce played and embodied,” he added.
 
Mr. Hopkins first joined the Festival in 1975, playing Speed in The Two Gentlemen of Verona and Dromio of Syracuse in The Comedy of Errors. Over 24 Stratford seasons, his many other Shakespearean roles included Touchstone in As You Like It, Parolles in All’s Well That Ends Well and Gonzalo in The Tempest. His performances as Friar Laurence in Romeo and Juliet and Robert Cecil in Timothy Findley’s Elizabeth Rex are preserved on film for future generations.

Mr. Hopkins’s last season with the Festival was in 2007, when he played Old Gobbo in The Merchant of Venice and the Fool in Brian Bedford’s King Lear. Productions he directed here include The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Knight of the Burning Pestle, and Love’s Labour’s Lost, which Mr. Cimolino has selected for the dedication. “It is a play that reminds me of the generosity and love that drove Bern’s great work as an acting coach and mentor,” said Mr. Cimolino.

As Head of Drama at the Banff Centre in the 1980s, as Director of the Festival’s Young Company from 1989 to 1992 and, more recently, as a teacher at the Birmingham Conservatory, Mr. Hopkins was a guide and an inspiration to countless fellow artists, in Stratford and across the country.

Mr. Atienza, Ms Campion and Mr. Hopkins will be deeply missed and their contributions well remembered.

-30-

Shaw Festival principal casting for 2015


MEDIA RELEASE


October 29, 2014

The Shaw Festival today announced principal casting and creative team details for its 54th season.

“I am very happy with our casting for the 2015 season,” said Artistic Director Jackie Maxwell. “It’s a vital and engaging combination of fresh faces, younger ensemble members stepping up and taking on leading roles, well-loved actors returning to The Shaw and core ensemble members taking on surprising new challenges.”


FESTIVAL THEATRE


Sweet Charity

Book by Neil Simon, music by Cy Coleman and lyrics by Dorothy Fields
Based on the original screenplay by Federico Fellini, Tullio Pinelli and Ennio Flaiano
Produced for the Broadway stage by Fryer, Carr and Harris
Originally conceived, staged and choreographed by Bob Fosse
Previews – April 17 Opens – May 16 Closes – October 31
Sponsored by TD Bank Group

Julie Martell returns as Sweet Charity

Julie Martell returns to the Shaw Festival to play dance hall hostess Charity Hope Valentine, joining Kyle Blair as Oscar Lindquist and Elodie Gillett as Helene, Charity’s friend and fellow Fandango Ballroom dancer. Newcomer Kimberley Rampersad makes her Shaw debut as Nickie, the third of the dance hall’s chief trio. This show also features company member Jeremy Carver-James stepping into the featured role of Daddy Brubeck, along with Jacqueline Thair as Ursula March, Jay Turvey as Herman and returning Festival favourite Mark Uhre as Vittorio Vidal.

Directed by Morris Panych, musical direction by Paul Sportelli, choreographed by Parker Esse, set designed by Ken MacDonald, costumes designed by Charlotte Dean, lighting designed by Bonnie Beecher, projections designed by Cameron Davis and sound designed by John Lott.


Pygmalion

By Bernard Shaw
Previews – May 31 Opens – June 27 Closes – October 24
Sponsored by BMO Financial Group

Patrick McManus and Harveen Sandhu star as the latest incarnations of Pygmalion duo

Harveen Sandhu is Eliza Doolittle, opposite Patrick McManus’s linguistics professor Henry Higgins and Jeff Meadows’s Colonel Pickering, in a Pygmalion set in modern day London. This new take on Shaw’s popular “anti-romantic” comedy also features Donna Belleville as Mrs. Higgins and Mary Haney as Mrs. Pearce.

Directed by Peter Hinton, set designed by Eo Sharp, costume designed by Christina Poddubiuk and lighting designed by Kevin Lamotte.


Light Up the Sky

By Moss Hart
Previews – June 25 Opens – July 25 Closes – October 11

Claire Jullien, Steven Sutcliffe, Kelli Fox, Laurie Paton and Thom Marriott lead Moss Hart backstage comedy

The Shaw is pleased to welcome back Steven Sutcliffe as neurotic director Carleton Fitzgerald and Kelli Fox as former ice skating star and first time producer, Frances Black. They join Claire Jullien as diva Irene Livingston, Laurie Paton as her stage mother Stella Livingston and Thom Marriott as producer Sidney Black in Moss Hart’s glorious ensemble comedy. Fiona Byrne, Charlie Gallant, Graeme Somerville, Kelly Wong and returning company member Shawn Wright join in the theatrical antics.

Directed by Blair Williams, designed by William Schmuck, lighting designed by Louise Guinand and original music by Marek Norman.


ROYAL GEORGE THEATRE


Peter and the Starcatcher

A play by Rick Elice
Based on the novel by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson
Music by Wayne Barker
Originally produced on Broadway by Nancy Nagel Gibbs, Greg Schaffert, Eva Price, Tom Smedes and Disney Theatrical Productions
Previews – April 8 Opens – May 16 Closes – November 1
Sponsored by Scotiabank

Charlie Gallant and Kate Besworth lead company on a magical journey in Peter Pan prequel

Young Shaw ensemble members Charlie Gallant and Kate Besworth play the title roles in this delightful adventure. Martin Happer brings his derring–do to the role of pirate Blackstache and Patrick Galligan joins the exploits as Lord Astor. Billy Lake, Graeme Somerville, Jonathan Tan, Kelly Wong, Jenny L. Wright and Shawn Wright complete the cast for this rollicking tale.

Directed by Jackie Maxwell, movement by Valerie Moore, musical direction by Ryan deSouza, designed by Judith Bowden, lighting designed by Kevin Lamotte.


You Never Can Tell

By Bernard Shaw
Previews – April 26 Opens – May 14 Closes – October 25

Gray Powell, Tara Rosling, Julia Course, Patrick McManus and Peter Millard in Shaw’s seaside comedy

Gray Powell is Valentine, the dentist; Julia Course is Gloria, the object of his affection; Tara Rosling is Mrs. Clandon, Patrick McManus plays her once lost husband Fergus Crampton, along with Peter Millard as the wise waiter William in Shaw’s most light-hearted play. The production also features Jennifer Dzialoszynski as Dolly and Stephen Jackman-Torkoff as Philip.

Directed by Jim Mezon, designed by Leslie Frankish, lighting designed by Kimberly Purtell, projections designed by Cameron Davis and original music and sound designed by John Gzowski.


The Divine: A Play for Sarah Bernhardt

By Michel Marc Bouchard, translated by Linda Gaboriau
Previews – July 5 Opens – July 24 Closes – October 11

Fiona Reid is the “Divine Sarah” in the world premiere of a Michel Marc Bouchard commissioned work

Fiona Reid plays Sarah Bernhardt, the legendary actress and theatrical superstar, alongside Ben Sanders and Wade Bogert-O’Brien as the young seminarians Michaud and Talbot, whose lives become intertwined with hers. The production also features Darcy Gerhart as Madeleine Courteline, Mary Haney as Madame Talbot and Martin Happer as Brother Casgrain.

Directed by Jackie Maxwell, designed by Michael Gianfrancesco, lighting designed by Bonnie Beecher and original music and sound designed by John Gzowski.


COURT HOUSE THEATRE


The Lady from the Sea

By Henrik Ibsen, in a new version by Erin Shields
Previews – April 30 Opens – May 15 Closes – September 13

Moya O’Connell revisits Ibsen as Ellida, the lady from the sea

After playing the iconic title role in Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler, Moya O’Connell takes on another Ibsen heroine – the mysterious and elusive Ellida in The Lady from the Sea. Ric Reid is Doctor Wangel, her kindly provincial husband. They are joined by ensemble members Neil Barclay, Kyle Blair, Darcy Gerhart, Jacqueline Thair and Mark Uhre as the Stranger.

Directed by Meg Roe, designed by Camellia Koo, lighting designed by Kevin Lamotte and original music and sound designed by Alessandro Juliani.


Top Girls

By Caryl Churchill
Previews – May 23 Opens – June 26 Closes – September 12

Top female talents assembled to present powerful contemporary classic

Fiona Byrne leads a brilliant cross-generational ensemble of Shaw women as Marlene, the ultimate “Top Girl”. A warm welcome back to Tara Rosling, who plays her sister Joyce. They join the cast of Catherine McGregor, Claire Jullien, Laurie Paton, Julia Course and Tess Benger in one of contemporary theatre’s most celebrated works.

Directed by Vikki Anderson, designed by Sue LePage and lighting designed by Louise Guinand.


The Twelve-Pound Look

By J.M. Barrie
Previews – June 11 Opens – June 27 Closes – September 12
Sponsored by Vintage Hotels

Patrick Galligan, Moya O’Connell and Kate Besworth in one-act J.M. Barrie Lunchtime

As Sir Harry Sims, Patrick Galligan discovers what twelve pounds and an ounce of freedom can do for a woman. Moya O’Connell is Kate, his former wife, and Kate Besworth is Lady Sims, his current wife, in one of Barrie’s most witty and inventive one-act plays. The production also features Neil Barclay and Harveen Sandhu.

Directed by Lezlie Wade and designed by William Schmuck.


STUDIO THEATRE


The Intelligent Homosexual’s Guide to Capitalism and Socialism
with a Key to the Scriptures

By Tony Kushner
Previews – July 11 Opens – July 26 Closes – October 10
Sponsored by Paradigm Capital Inc.

Tony Kushner’s iHO features dream cast of Jim Mezon, Kelli Fox, Steven Sutcliffe, Gray Powell and Fiona Reid

Some of the Shaw Festival’s heaviest hitters have been assembled for this production of Kushner’s masterpiece – Jim Mezon as family patriarch Gus; Kelli Fox as Empty, Steven Sutcliffe as Pill, Gray Powell as Vic, his three children; and Fiona Reid as his sister Clio; with Diana Donnelly as Maeve, Thom Marriott as Adam and Ben Sanders as Eli.

Directed by Eda Holmes, designed by Peter Hartwell, lighting designed by Kevin Lamotte and original music by Paul Sportelli.


STUDIO UNDERGROUND


The Next Whisky Bar – A Kurt Weill Cabaret

Created by Paul Sportelli and Jay Turvey
Opens – August 21 Closes – September 5
Sponsored by James F. Brown

For six nights only, in the Studio Underground, a 1920s dockside bar in Germany will materialise populated by lost souls presenting their hopes, dreams and hurts to the beguiling music of composer Kurt Weill. Grab a drink and listen to David Ball, Tess Benger, Jeremy-Carver James, Elodie Gillett, Patrick McManus, Peter Millard and Julain Molnar sing a combination of known and not-so-known songs by Kurt Weill accompanied by a six-piece band.

Directed by Jay Turvey, designed by William Schmuck, lighting designed by Kevin Lamotte and sound designed by John Lott.

The Shaw also welcomes back current Shaw Ensemble members Kristi Frank, Aaron Hastelow, Peter Krantz, Kiera Sangster, Travis Seetoo, as well as new members Ayinde Blake, Andrew Broderick, Jasmine Chen, Colton Curtis, James Daly, Howard J. Davis, Starr Domingue, Lindsey Frazier, Kelly Grainger, Matt Nethersole and Genny Sermonia who will be making their Shaw Festival debuts this season.

Bernard Hopkins

As published in the London Free Press, October 23, 2014.


The London and Canadian theatre community are mourning Bernard Hopkins, who starred at the Stratford Festival and was a former artistic director at the Grand Theatre.

“We lost our Beloved Bern (Wednesday) Oct. 22 at 4:02 p.m. He passed peacefully in the arms of his husband Ian White. He thanks you ALL for your support, sympathy and love,” said a post on Hopkins’ Facebook page.

The cause of death was not disclosed.

Born in Liverpool and raised in London, England, Hopkins was 77.

“I’d like to make a change but I’m too old to sell shoes,” Hopkins told The Free Press in 2007 when asked what he might be doing if he hadn’t been in the theatre.

“I used to say I’ve never been without a cigarette or a glass of wine. I no longer smoke and the wine is down to a minimum, so what the hell am I doing? . . . I’m going out to play Lear (as the Fool in the 2007 Stratford production) tonight.”

After arriving in Canada decades ago, Hopkins played a dizzying array of theatre roles on- and off-stage and influenced many careers.

“I first worked with Bernard when I was a relatively young director,” Grand Theatre artistic director Susan Ferley said Thursday in recalling their first meeting decades ago at a Kamloops, B.C., theatre company,

“Here was this seasoned actor. He was funny and generous and supportive. What I realized in hindsight is some of the things I say and do as a director I can remember him in a very gentle and generous way mentoring me through the process.”

At the Grand, Hopkins was responsible for 23 productions, including A Christmas Carol, Gypsy and Equus.

Later, when Hopkins was helming the Banff centre for the arts in the 1980s, he invited Ferley to work with him there.

Other friends of Hopkins shared their loss on the late actor’s Facebook page.

“He danced into our lives and into our hearts. He took his final bow yesterday. My sympathy to all of his extended, theatrical family,” one friend from the Stratford Festival said on Facebook Thursday.

“You are with me, dearest man and mentor, every time I step in front of any classroom or coaching, ever. You are with me every line I speak on-stage, in a rehearsal room, in an audition. You are in every word in every play I write,” said another friend in a Facebook post.

Hopkins made his professional Shakespearean debut in 1964 playing Lorenzo and Puck in two productions that had Ralph Richardson as Shylock (The Merchant of Venice) and Bottom (A Midsummer Night’s Dream). The productions opened in Britain and then played extensively in South America and Europe.

He first appeared at the Stratford Festival in 1975, playing Speed in The Two Gentlemen of Verona and Dromio of Syracuse in The Comedy of Errors.

Over 24 seasons, the last one in 2007, his other Shakespearean roles at Stratford included Touchstone in As You Like It, Parolles in All’s Well That Ends Well and Gonzalo in The Tempest.

Among his film roles for Stratford-tied productions were Friar Laurence in Romeo and Juliet and Robert Cecil in Timothy Findley’s Elizabeth Rex.

Stratford productions he directed include Love’s Labour’s Lost, The Merry Wives of Windsor and The Knight of the Burning Pestle.

He was also director of Stratford’s Young Company from 1989 to 1992 and a teacher at Birmingham Conservatory.

His ties to London go back many years and he lived here during much of the non-Stratford year.

Hopkins was the artistic director at the Grand Theatre in London from 1980-1983.

In recent times, he mentored the London theatre community and was involved in productions here.

james.reaney@sunmedia.ca

Stratford Festival key casting 2015



Click here for 2015 Season Video


MEDIA RELEASE


October 20, 2014

Casting for the 2015 season of the Stratford Festival is under way with a number of key roles in place.

Artistic Director Antoni Cimolino is delighted to welcome back: Graham Abbey, Sarah Afful, Matt Alfano, Gabriel Antonacci, Matthew Armet, Maev Beaty, Carla Bennett, Evan Buliung, Jacqueline Burtney, Lally Cadeau, Ben Carlson, Shane Carty, Stephen Cota, Keith Dinicol, Sara Farb, Barbara Fulton, Ryan Gifford, Jonathan Goad, Sean Alexander Hauk, Deborah Hay, Alexandra Herzog, Randy Hughson, Peter Hutt, Robin Hutton, Bonnie Jordan, Krista Leis, Monique Lund, Chad McFadden, Yanna McIntosh, Seana McKenna, Gordon S. Miller, Marcus Nance, Cory O’Brien, Denise Oucharek, Stephen Ouimette, Lucy Peacock, Gord Rand, Glynis Ranney, Jennifer Rider-Shaw, Tom Rooney, Steve Ross, Tyrone Savage, Jason Sermonia, Mike Shara, Ian Simpson, Scott Wentworth, Brigit Wilson, Jonathan Winsby, Geraint Wyn Davies and Joseph Ziegler.

Mr. Cimolino is also pleased to welcome newcomers Alex Black, Alexis Gordon, Alana Hibbert, James Kall, Anita Krause, Ethan Lafleur, Melanie McInenly, Stephanie Rothenberg, Cynthia Smithers and Robin Evan Willis.

“I am excited about the quality of these players,” says Mr. Cimolino. “We have an unparalleled company of actors who have been working together for a number of years. They know one another and the trust is there, which means they can push the boundaries.

“Our audiences find great joy in watching them work together over time in various combinations. For instance, the relationship between Seana McKenna and Geraint Wyn Davies that began with Mary Stuart and grew as the love interest in Mother Courage will continue – with great electricity – in Hamlet and The Physicists next year. As with others in the company, the level of trust between these two extraordinary actors allows for a sense of improvisation, a sense of freedom.

“We also have a number of exceptional people who come and go each year, and this serves to reinvigorate the company, while also providing actors with opportunities to experience new things. Then there are the younger actors, who have been here for a few seasons and are now hitting their stride, and they are joined by even newer faces making their Stratford debuts. If you look at theatre over the years, you see that it is this style of company building that allows you to do significant work.”


FESTIVAL THEATRE

SUPPORT FOR THE 2015 SEASON OF THE FESTIVAL THEATRE IS GENEROUSLY PROVIDED BY
CLAIRE & DANIEL BERNSTEIN

Jonathan Goad to play Hamlet in the season opener

HAMLET | BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
DIRECTED BY ANTONI CIMOLINO
PREVIEWS START MAY 1 | OPENS MAY 25 | CLOSES OCTOBER 11
PRODUCTION SUPPORT: DRS. M.L. MYERS & THE LATE W.P. HAYMAN, JANE PETERSEN BURFIELD & FAMILY, ESTHER & SAM SARICK IN HONOUR OF
ANTONI CIMOLINO, BARBARA & JOHN SCHUBERT, AND CATHERINE & DAVID WILKES

Highly regarded for his profoundly emotive performances, Jonathan Goad will take on the role of Hamlet in the 2015 season opener, directed by Mr. Cimolino. The production’s stellar cast also features Seana McKenna as Gertrude and Geraint Wyn Davies as Claudius and the Ghost.

Mr. Goad is well remembered for his impassioned portrayals of such key characters as the Bastard in the 2004 production of King John, Iago in the 2007 production of Othello, Mark Antony in 2009’s Julius Caesar and Hippolytus in Phèdre that same year. This season, he was lauded for his Kent in King Lear, and for his remarkable versatility as he alternated the roles of Titania and Oberon in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. His other Stratford highlights over 12 seasons include Harold Hill in The Music Man, Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet, Angelo in Measure for Measure, Leo Katz in Pentecost, Quarlous in Bartholomew Fair, Frondoso in Fuente Ovejuna, and the title role in Pericles. Mr. Goad has performed at theatres across the country and has worked on numerous films and television series, including the hit CBC show Republic of Doyle, in which he plays Christian Doyle.

The production will also feature longtime Festival favourites Tom Rooney as Polonius and Mike Shara as Laertes.


Stephanie Rothenberg to play Maria with
Ben Carlson as Captain von Trapp

THE SOUND OF MUSIC | MUSIC BY RICHARD RODGERS, LYRICS BY OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN II
BOOK BY HOWARD LINDSAY AND RUSSEL CROUSE
SUGGESTED BY “THE TRAPP FAMILY SINGERS” BY MARIA AUGUSTA TRAPP
DIRECTED AND CHOREOGRAPHED BY DONNA FEORE
PREVIEWS START APRIL 21 | OPENS MAY 26 | CLOSES OCTOBER 18
PRODUCTION CO-SPONSOR: UNION GAS LIMITED
PRODUCTION SUPPORT: THE HARKINS/MANNING FAMILIES IN MEMORY OF
JAMES & SUSAN HARKINS AND BY RIKI TUROFSKY & CHARLES PETERSEN

Stephanie Rothenberg, who recently played Rosemary in the Tony-nominated Broadway revival of How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, will make her Stratford debut as Maria in The Sound of Music. Ben Carlson will mark his eighth season with his first role in a Stratford musical, playing Captain von Trapp. The production will be directed and choreographed by Donna Feore.

Ms Rothenberg made her Broadway debut in 2011 in How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying starring opposite Nick Jonas after appearing as a member of the ensemble in the original Broadway cast with Daniel Radcliffe. She followed up her Broadway run by originating roles in four world premières: Young Irene Castle in Castle Walk at the New York Musical Theatre Festival, Elinor Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility, The Musical at the Denver Center Theater Company, Princess Anne in Roman Holiday at the Guthrie Theater and Princess Clementine in Frog Kiss, The Musical at Virginia Stage Company. Ms Rothenberg grew up in Nashville, TN, recording for country music artists, animated shows and Walt Disney. She recently filmed an episode of Tina Fey’s upcoming show, The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, starring Ellie Kemper and Jane Krakowski.

Mr. Carlson’s musical abilities are a secret to no one. For his recent role in the Canadian Stage production of London Road, he shared in a Dora Mavor Moore Award. In 2011 he played a singing and guitar-playing Feste in Des McAnuff’s rock-and-roll Twelfth Night. This season, in addition to playing the Chaplain in Mother Courage and Her Children, he also played guitar and bass in the production, and he performed a one-man musical about the life of Noël Coward for the Forum. Mr. Carlson brings to the role of Captain von Trapp his considerable skills as a dramatic and comedic actor. His Stratford credits include Octavius Caesar in this season’s Antony and Cleopatra, Burleigh in Mary Stuart, Charles Condomine in Blithe Spirit, Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing, Fluellen in Henry V, Alceste in The Misanthrope, Leontes in The Winter’s Tale, John Worthing in The Importance of Being Earnest, and the title role in Hamlet, a part he also played at Chicago Shakespeare Theatre, winning a Joseph Jefferson Award.

Ms Rothenberg and Mr. Carlson will be joined by Shane Carty as Max Detweiler, Anita Krause as the Mother Abbess and Robin Evan Willis as Elsa Schraeder.


Ben Carlson and Deborah Hay star
as Petruchio and Katherina

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW | BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
DIRECTED BY CHRIS ABRAHAM
PREVIEWS START MAY 11 | OPENS JUNE 5 | CLOSES OCTOBER 10
PRODUCTION SUPPORT: LARRY ENKIN & FAMILY IN MEMORY OF SHARON ENKIN,
AND BY MARTIE & BOB SACHS

Ben Carlson and Deborah Hay will reunite on the Festival stage as the sparring lovers Petruchio and Katherina in The Taming of the Shrew, directed by Chris Abraham. Sparks last flew between the pair when they played Benedick and Beatrice in the Festival’s 2012 production of Much Ado About Nothing.

Ms Hay, who this season lit up the stage as Sally Bowles in Cabaret and Dorothea in A Lovely Sundayfor Creve Coeur at the Shaw Festival, will return for her sixth Stratford season. She was last seen at the Festival in 2013 as Milady de Winter in The Three Musketeers and Emilia in Othello, a part for which she received great critical praise. Her previous Stratford credits include Alice in Henry V, Bianca in The Taming of the Shrew, Audrey in As You Like It and Katharine in Love’s Labour’s Lost. Ms Hay’s highly acclaimed Shaw Festival roles also include Eliza Doolittle in the hit production of My Fair Lady, Hesione Hushabye in Heartbreak House and an unforgettable Billie Dawn in Born Yesterday.

Mr. Carlson and Ms Hay will be joined by Sarah Afful as Bianca, Peter Hutt as Baptista, Gordon S. Miller as Biondello, Tom Rooney as Tranio and Mike Shara as Hortensio.


Love’s Labour’s Lost to feature Mike Shara

LOVE’S LABOUR’S LOST | BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
DIRECTED BY JOHN CAIRD
PREVIEWS START JULY 30 | OPENS AUGUST 14 | CLOSES OCTOBER 9
PRODUCTION SUPPORT: LARRY & SALLY RAYNER

Mike Shara, who in just six seasons has become one of the Festival’s best-loved performers, will play Berowne in Shakespeare’s vivacious comedy Love’s Labour’s Lost, directed by John Caird.

Mr. Shara had a remarkable season this year, giving three indelible performances on the Festival stage: a vicious Cornwall in King Lear, a dreamy Demetrius in A Midsummer Night’s Dream and a scheming Aimwell in The Beaux’ Stratagem, whom he played with marvellous comedic flair. Since joining the company in 2009, he has played such memorable roles as Roderigo in Othello, Aramis in The Three Musketeers, Cornelius Hackl in The Matchmaker, Cloten in Cymbeline and Christian in Cyrano de Bergerac. Mr. Shara is also a veteran of the Shaw Festival and has performed across the country. His television work includes Whatever, Murdoch Mysteries, Little Mosque on the Prairie and Queer as Folk.

The production will also feature Tom Rooney as Holofernes.


AVON THEATRE

SUPPORT FOR THE 2015 SEASON OF THE AVON THEATRE IS GENEROUSLY PROVIDED BY THE BIRMINGHAM FAMILY

Sara Farb to play Anne Frank

SCHULICH CHILDREN’S PLAYS PRESENTS
THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK
BY FRANCES GOODRICH AND ALBERT HACKETT | ADAPTED BY WENDY KESSELMAN
DIRECTED BY JILLIAN KEILEY
PREVIEWS START APRIL 22 | OPENS MAY 28 | CLOSES OCTOBER 10

After playing two of Shakespeare’s most significant young women – Cordelia and Jessica – rising star Sara Farb will take on one of the 20th century’s most iconic figures: Anne Frank. Lucy Peacock will play her mother, Mrs. Frank, with Joseph Ziegler playing her father, Mr. Frank, in a production directed by Jillian Keiley.

Having made a great impact with her Stratford debut as Jessica in The Merchant of Venice and Doña Estefania in The Three Musketeers, Ms Farb took on two key roles in 2014: Cordelia in King Lear and Cherry in The Beaux’ Stratagem. For her recent portrayal of Natalie in Citadel Theatre and Theatre Calgary’s co-production of Next to Normal, Ms Farb won a Calgary Critics Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical. She played Adele in The Passion of Adele Hugo at Eastern Front Theatre, and had roles in A Midsummer Night’s Dream at Canadian Stage and The Sisters Rosensweig at Harold Green Jewish Theatre. She will next be seen in Theatre Passe Muraille’s production of R-E-B-E-C-C-A, a unique solo piece that she has written about her younger sister.

The production will also feature Yanna McIntosh as Mrs. Van Daan.


Alexis Gordon and Jonathan Winsby take the leads in
Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Carousel

RODGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN’S CAROUSEL
MUSIC BY RICHARD RODGERS, BOOK AND LYRICS BY OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN II
BASED ON FERENC MOLNAR’S PLAY “LILIOM” AS ADAPTED BY BENJAMIN F. GLAZER
ORIGINAL DANCES BY AGNES DE MILLE | CHOREOGRAPHED BY MICHAEL LICHTEFELD
DIRECTED BY SUSAN H. SCHULMAN
PREVIEWS START MAY 5 | OPENS MAY 29 | CLOSES OCTOBER 11
PRODUCTION SUPPORT: CEC & LINDA RORABECK

After stealing hearts as Lancelot in 2011’s Camelot and touring to Broadway in Jesus Christ Superstar, Jonathan Winsby returns to play Billy Bigelow in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Carousel. Firmly by his side will be Alexis Gordon, making her Stratford debut as Julie Jordan. The production will be directed by Susan H. Schulman.

Though he made his Stratford debut in 2006 as Stewpot in South Pacific, Mr. Winsby has spent most of his career at the Arts Club Theatre in Vancouver, playing such roles as Galahad in Spamalot, Enjolras in Les Misérables, Gaston in Beauty and the Beast, Chris in Miss Saigon and Paul in Company. Mr. Winsby recently played Captain von Trapp in Gary Griffin’s The Sound of Music in concert at Carnegie Hall.

Ms Gordon was most recently seen in the world première of The Gravitational Pull of Bernice Trimble at Factory Theatre/Obsidian Theatre Company, as well as in the workshop production of Nicole Brook’s Obeah Opera at Nightwood Theatre Company. Other credits include roles in Recurring John and Paradises Lost at SummerWorks Festival, Canada Sings and Godspell at Victoria Petrolia Playhouse, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream at Driftwood Theatre.

The production will also feature Evan Buliung as the evildoer Jigger Craigin, Sean Alexander Hauk as Enoch Snow, Alana Hibbert as Nettie Fowler and Robin Evan Willis as Carrie Pipperidge.


Lucy Peacock, Joseph Ziegler team up as Mr. & Mrs. Hardcastle

SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER | BY OLIVER GOLDSMITH
DIRECTED BY MARTHA HENRY
PREVIEWS START MAY 16 | OPENS JUNE 4 | CLOSES OCTOBER 10
PRODUCTION SUPPORT: DR. DESTA LEAVINE IN MEMORY OF PAULINE LEAVINE

Together on the Stratford stage for the first time since 2009’s The Trespassers, Lucy Peacock and Joseph Ziegler will play Mr. and Mrs. Hardcastle in the hilarious Oliver Goldsmith comedy She Stoops to Conquer, directed by Martha Henry.

Ms Peacock is on a bit of a comic roll at the moment, having played the leads in two delightful productions this season – Judith Bliss in Hay Fever and Mrs. Sullen in The Beaux’ Stratagem. Ms Peacock has long been a shining star at Stratford, with a career studded with remarkable performances, including, most recently, her stirring portrayals of Mary Stuart in the 2013 runaway hit, Elora in the world première of Judith Thompson’s The Thrill and Nana in For the Pleasure of Seeing Her Again. Her credits also include the colourful Mrs. Munsch in Wanderlust, the leads in Hello, Dolly!, The King and I, and My Fair Lady, and her tour-de-force performance as all of the characters in The Blonde, the Brunette and the Vengeful Redhead. She has played more than 65 key roles at Stratford and has organized dozens of unforgettable cabarets, in particular the Late Night with Lucy Forum series, in which she performed and showcased the talents of her fellow company members.

Mr. Ziegler was seen most recently in this year’s electrifying production of Twelve Angry Men at Soulpepper Theatre. He has enjoyed a long and varied career in Canadian theatre, television and film. He first joined the Stratford company in 1983 and played many prominent roles over his first five seasons, including Berowne in Love’s Labour’s Lost, Hotspur in Henry IV Part One, Edgar in King Lear, Sir Andrew Aguecheek in Twelfth Night, Claudio in Measure for Measure and Posthumus in Cymbeline. He returned in 2000 to direct Paul Gross in Hamlet and was last seen as Hardy in Morris Panych’s The Trespassers in 2009. Mr. Ziegler, a founding member of Soulpepper Theatre, is the recipient of two Dora Awards.

Maev Beaty will play their daughter, Kate Hardcastle, with Sara Farb as Constance Neville and Tyrone Savage as Hastings.


TOM PATTERSON THEATRE

SUPPORT FOR THE 2015 SEASON OF THE TOM PATTERSON THEATRE IS GENEROUSLY PROVIDED BY
RICHARD ROONEY & LAURA DINNER

Seana McKenna, Geraint Wyn Davies and Graham Abbey star in The Physicists

THE PHYSICISTS | BY FRIEDRICH DÜRRENMATT
DIRECTED BY MILES POTTER
PREVIEWS START MAY 12 | OPENS MAY 27 | CLOSES SEPTEMBER 20
PRODUCTION SUPPORT: ALICE & TIM THORNTON

After their electrifying performances in Mother Courage and Her Children, Seana McKenna and Geraint Wyn Davies will light up the stage once more in The Physicists, playing Fräulein Doktor Mathilde von Zahnd and Johann Wilhelm Möbius. They will be joined by Graham Abbey, playing Herbert Georg Beutler (alias “Newton”). The production will be helmed by award-winning director Miles Potter.

Ms McKenna’s heart-breaking portrayals this season of Mother Courage and of Constance in King John were merely the latest in a string of unforgettable performances that have thrilled theatregoers across the country and in the U.S. During her distinguished career she has played almost all of Shakespeare’s leading ladies, as well as his wife, Anne Hathaway, in the one- woman show Shakespeare’s Will. She has twice played Queen Elizabeth at Stratford, in last year’s hit Mary Stuart and in 2002’s Richard III. Renowned for her scorching portrayals of such tragic figures as Clytemestra, Medea and Phèdre, Ms McKenna is equally adept at comic pursuits, recently winning great praise for her Madame Arcati in Blithe Spirit and Dolly Levi in The Matchmaker. She also added some sizzle as La Marquise de Merteuil in 2010’s Dangerous Liaisons. Ms McKenna was recently honoured with two honorary degrees, from the University of Toronto’s Trinity College and the American Conservatory Theatre in San Francisco.

At once powerfully persuasive and delightfully entertaining, Mr. Wyn Davies is one of the Festival’s most lauded leading men. In addition to his relentlessly charming Cook in Mother Courage, he gave a gripping performance as Mark Antony in this season’s Antony and Cleopatra. He began his Stratford career in 1986, playing the title role in Pericles and Antipholus of Syracuse in The Boys from Syracuse. Since then, his stage career has taken him throughout North America and the U.K. At Stratford, his recent triumphs include Duke Vincentio in Measure for Measure and the Earl of Leicester in Mary Stuart. He has also played Stephano in The Tempest and Bottom in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, as well as the title roles in Julius Caesar and Henry V, and Dylan Thomas in the one-man show Do Not Go Gentle. He has dozens of film and television credits, including key roles in Republic of Doyle, ReGenesis, 24, Slings and Arrows, Airwolf, Forever Knight and American Psycho II.

Over the course of his 16 seasons at the Festival, Mr. Abbey has given audiences a long string of captivating performances, most recently including his richly drawn portrayals of Philip the Bastard in King John and Count Johan Oxenstierna in Christina, The Girl King this season. Other memorable highlights of his Stratford career include Iago in Othello, Posthumus in Cymbeline, Aigisthos in Elektra, Petruchio in The Taming of the Shrew, D’Artagnan in The Three Musketeers, as well as Henry V, Macbeth, Romeo and Henry VIII. His extensive television career includes the series lead, Gray Jackson, in The Border, as well as recurring roles in Degrassi, Murdoch Mysteries, Covert Affairs and Republic of Doyle. Mr. Abbey is currently working on The Breath of Kings, a dramatic adaptation of four Shakespeare plays – Richard II, Henry IV Part 1, Henry IV Part 2 and Henry V – developed by him in collaboration with Daniel Brooks and John Murrell through the Stratford Festival Laboratory.

The production will also feature Randy Hughson as Richard Voss.


Evan Buliung to play Pericles

THE ADVENTURES OF PERICLES | BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
DIRECTED BY SCOTT WENTWORTH
PREVIEWS START MAY 8 | OPENS MAY 30 | CLOSES SEPTEMBER 19
PRODUCTION SUPPORT: M. VAILE FAINER

Beloved for his heart-rending and richly drawn characterizations, Evan Buliung will play the title role in Shakespeare’s sweeping drama The Adventures of Pericles, directed by Scott Wentworth.

Mr. Buliung had an outstanding season this year, giving incredibly nuanced performances as Edgar in King Lear and the alternating roles of Titania and Oberon in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, along with a delightful comic turn as Count Bellair in The Beaux’ Stratagem. In his nine Stratford seasons, Mr. Buliung’s highlights include an acclaimed portrayal of Tom Joad in The Grapes of Wrath, Roger in The Little Years, Mac in King of Thieves, Petruchio in The Taming of the Shrew and Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet. His credits elsewhere include Dumptsy in Idiot’s Delight and Jamie in Long Day’s Journey into Night at Soulpepper Theatre, Macduff in Macbeth at Chicago Shakespeare, and numerous leading roles at the Shaw Festival. Mr. Buliung also originated the role of Khashoggi in We Will Rock You in Toronto and Aragorn in the world première of The Lord of the Rings, for which he earned a Dora Award nomination.

The production will also feature Deborah Hay as Thaisa, Marina and Antiochus’s Daughter, and Brigit Wilson as the Bawd.


Gord Rand to play Oedipus

OEDIPUS REX | BY SOPHOCLES
DIRECTED BY DANIEL BROOKS
PREVIEWS START JUNE 30 | OPENS JULY 16 | CLOSES SEPTEMBER 18
PRODUCTION SUPPORT: M.E.H. FOUNDATION

Gord Rand will return for his second Stratford season to play King Oedipus in Oedipus Rex, directed by Daniel Brooks. Yanna McIntosh, hot off her powerful performance as Cleopatra in this season’s Antony and Cleopatra, will play Jocasta.

Mr. Rand spent this season at the Shaw Festival playing Leonard Charteris in The Philanderer and Charles Bentham in Juno and the Paycock. An actor and writer, he has performed on stages across North America including the National Arts Centre, The Vancouver Playhouse, Tarragon Theatre, Theatre Calgary and Canadian Stage. He is well-remembered for his performance as Uri, a naked Ukranian plutonium dealer, in The Innocent Eye Test at Mirvish, for which he received a Dora Award. He recently toured with the Edinburgh Festival winner Goodness, playing Edinburgh, New York and Vancouver, and just returned from Rwanda. His film and television credits include Republic of Doyle, Lost Girl, Maps to the Stars, Covert Affairs, The Listener, Saving Hope, Flashpoint and Death Comes to Town with Kids in the Hall. Mr. Rand made his Stratford debut in 2002, playing Owen Barclay in Shadows during the Studio Theatre’s inaugural season.

Ms McIntosh will celebrate her 10th Stratford season in 2015. Before heating up the stage in Antony and Cleopatra, she was last seen in the company in 2012, with key roles in two of the season’s most highly lauded productions, playing the Queen in Cymbeline and a powerful and highly original Elektra. Other highlights of her Stratford career include Queen Elizabeth in Richard III, Grace in The Little Years, Hermione in The Winter’s Tale, Titania in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Helen in The Trojan Woman, Mme. Volanges in Dangerous Liaisons and Lady Macbeth. Ms McIntosh is a Dora and Gemini Award-winning actor, whose Toronto credits include Condoleeza Rice in Stuff Happens and the title roles in Mary Stuart, Hedda Gabler and Belle. She was recently nominated for the Christopher Plummer Fellowship Award of Excellence.


Jonathan Goad, Stephen Ouimette and Scott Wentworth team up in The Alchemist

THE ALCHEMIST | BY BEN JONSON
DIRECTED BY ANTONI CIMOLINO
PREVIEWS START AUGUST 1 | OPENS AUGUST 15 | CLOSES SEPTEMBER 19
PRODUCTION SUPPORT: SYLVIA D. CHROMINSKA, DR. DENNIS & DOROTHEA HACKER, DIANA TREMAIN AND BARBARA & CHIP VALLIS

Three true Festival favourites will team up in Mr. Cimolino’s production of Ben Jonson’s satirical comedy The Alchemist: Jonathan Goad as Face, Stephen Ouimette as Subtle, and Scott Wentworth as Epicure Mammon.

Mr. Ouimette will make a late-season return to the Festival after reprising his role in the widely acclaimed production of Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh with Nathan Lane and Brian Dennehy at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in early 2015. Mr. Ouimette gave audiences a Fool for the memory books in this season’s King Lear, and inspired great jubilation as Bottom in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. In a career filled with unforgettable performances, Mr. Ouimette has played Lucio in Measure for Measure, Estragon in Waiting for Godot, Sir Andrew Aguecheek in Twelfth Night, Sam in The Homecoming, Hysterium in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Canon Chasuble in The Importance of Being Earnest and Touchstone in As You Like It, as well as the title roles in Hamlet, King John, Amadeus and Richard III. In addition to his work in Iceman, Mr. Ouimette is remembered in Chicago for his leading performances in The Taming of the Shrew and Troilus and Cressida. He starred alongside Mark Rylance, David Hyde Pierce and Joanna Lumley in La Bête in London’s West End and on Broadway. He is a celebrated director as well as an actor and has been the recipient of Gemini, Dora and Sterling awards.

This season, Mr. Wentworth played a most memorable Gloucester in King Lear, a suave Theseus in A Midsummer Night’s Dream and a slovenly Squire Sullen in The Beaux’ Stratagem. His 2013 season was even more remarkable as he wowed audiences in three unforgettable leading roles: Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof, Shylock in The Merchant of Venice and Capulet in Romeo and Juliet. In a career that spans 20 seasons at Stratford, he has played Tom in The Glass Menagerie, Tranio in The Taming of the Shrew, Mark Antony in Julius Caesar, Hubert in King John, Iago in Othello, Bosola in The Duchess of Malfi and Sky Masterson twice in Guys and Dolls, as well as the title roles in Macbeth, Richard III and Henry IV Part 1. He is a Tony-nominated actor, a director and playwright whose work has been celebrated on Broadway, in London’s West End, on television, and in films and theatres across North America. As previously announced, Mr. Wentworth will also take the helm of next season’s The Adventures of Pericles.

The production will also feature Randy Hughson as Tribulation and Brigit Wilson as Dol Common.


STUDIO THEATRE

SUPPORT FOR THE 2015 SEASON OF THE STUDIO THEATRE IS GENEROUSLY PROVIDED BY SANDRA & JIM PITBLADO

Lead casting for Possible Worlds still to come

POSSIBLE WORLDS | BY JOHN MIGHTON
DIRECTED BY MITCHELL CUSHMAN
PREVIEWS START JULY 1 | OPENS JULY 15 | CLOSES SEPTEMBER 19


Gordon S. Miller will return for his ninth Stratford season to play Williams. Maev Beaty to play Kate in The Last Wife

THE LAST WIFE | BY KATE HENNIG | WORLD PREMIÈRE
DIRECTED BY ALAN DILWORTH
PREVIEWS START JULY 30 | OPENS AUGUST 14 | CLOSES SEPTEMBER 20
PRODUCTION SUPPORT: KARON C. BALES & CHARLES E. BEALL

Maev Beaty, who fast won a place as a leading player this season with her highly lauded portrayal of Goneril in King Lear, will play Katherine Parr, the last wife of Henry VIII, in the world première of Kate Hennig’s new play, The Last Wife, directed by Alan Dilworth.

Ms Beaty, a stalwart of Toronto theatre, also gave a striking performance as Hippolyta in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. A theatre-maker, actor, writer and voice artist, Ms Beaty is noted for such Toronto credits as Passion Play at Outside the March Theatre Company/Convergence Theatre/Sheep No Wool, La Ronde and Parfumerie at Soulpepper, Civility at Necessary Angel, and Outside the March’s Terminus, which won the SummerWorks Jury Prize and was later presented as part of the inaugural Off-Mirvish season at the Royal Alexandra Theatre. Ms Beaty has garnered seven Dora nominations, winning the award for her work in The Penelopiad. She is Co-Artistic Director of Sheep No Wool and an Artistic Associate of Groundwater Productions and Outside the March.

The production will also feature Sara Farb as Mary and Joseph Ziegler as Henry.

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